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To understand clearly how co-mobility fits alongside complementary transport options, sectors and issues, and to look better at the future of co-mobility we sometimes deliberately stand back and look back in from different angles.

 

Here are some ideas and themes.

 

Many of these appeared as Mobility Matters columns in Local Transport Today.

 

Co-mobility & Themes

Low emission lifestyles & targeting tailpipe emissions

With a big focus on tackling tailpipe emissions, this article looks at the case for tackling travel demand to reduce emissions.


   

Written in 2017, it was overtaken by All Change? The future of travel demand and the implications for policy and planning

Published in 2018

 

Low emission lifestyles

   
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Co-mobility & Themes

Data, data everywhere, And not a space to think

What is the role of data in driving policy and investment? And what do we mean by “data” anyway?


   

This article pauses and reflects on how we use data, information and evidence in the shared transport world.

 

Data & shared transport

   
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Co-mobility & Themes

Bike share: reaching people who could cycle, but don’t

 

Convincing more people to cycle is accepted as a good thing, and significant effort and resource has been committed to doing this.


   

This article looks at the role of public bike share – what sort of people use it that wouldn’t otherwise cycle, or who might not cycle for those sorts of trips?

 

Bike share - reaching people who could cycle but don't

 
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Co-mobility & Themes

Mobility Lifestyles

If there is a revolution in how we travel in the 21st century, it’s the shift from mode-by-mode transport to mix-it-up mobility lifestyles. Whilst this is broadly acknowledged, it isn’t well understood. Mode tribalism (bus, car, bike…) is being replaced by mobility tribes. Co-mobility services enable people to lead different types of mobility lifestyles and reduce car dependency.
  The more traditional urban transport planning approach has been to focus on the provision of the different transport modes and their relative merits for capacity, speed and price. For instance, if bus patronage is low we look at options for improving travel times, reliability and frequency or reducing fares. This created a type of mode-tribalism whereby the bus would compete with the train, the train with the car and so-on and so-forth. This is not to say that our transport system is without reproach but to improve the experience of those that use public transport we need to better understand the needs, expectations and attitudes of different sections of society.   So what? Understanding better future mobility lifestyles should inform policy and investment. We can design better places and provide policy and regulatory frameworks that lead to compelling future lifestyles that involve good mobility.   Good Mobility is all about “mobility lifestyles” that – compared to those of today – have less environmental impact (emissions, place) and are more equitable.  
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